Review: Rattled by Ellis Gunn

 

Title: Rattled: A rare first person account of surviving a stalker

Author: Ellis Gunn

Published: 1st May 2022, Allen & Unwin

Status: Read June 2022 courtesy Allen & Unwin

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My Thoughts:

 

“….I was beginning to think I’d overreacted. Looking at it logically, he hadn’t done anything wrong.He hadn’t threatened me, or been offensive. A little over-eager maybe, a little too personal, but…probably nothing to worry about.”

It began with an casual interaction over a chest of drawers at an auction, Elise Gunn responded amiably to The Man’s attempt at conversation but politely brushed off his overture for further contact, and then ignored his unsolicited email. When he attempts to speak with her again, weeks later at the same auction house, Elise quickly makes her exit, feeling uncomfortable and anxious. When The Man next approaches Elise, she is walking home through a park having just dropped her son at school. He insists on walking with her, and during his one sided conversation he mentions details about Elise he is unlikely to know, unless he’s been following her for some time. The police are sympathetic when she reports her concerns but can’t do anything to help, and Elise is left feeling powerless.

Elise Gunn gives a powerful account of being stalked by a stranger with unknown motives. For Elise, The Man’s behaviour is ‘the straw that broke the camel’s back’. Quivering from hyper-vigilance, and expecting the worst, she is anxious, fearful, and panic-stricken. Unable to affect The Man’s behaviour, Elise attempts to take control of her own, seeking help from a victim support agency and CBT (Cognitive Behaviour Therapy).

In between each encounter with The Man, Gunn relates a former experience where she was affected by sexism, misogyny or male violence, from being heckled by a group of aggressive young men outside a pub, to enduring a rape by a trusted employer, and a poem the messages women too often receive about such encounters.

I was expecting an exclusive focus on stalking but Gunn also explores the broader research on topics related to trauma and PTSD, socialisation, gendered crime and inequality, and what is still needed for society to change. I am a little disappointed that, though Gunn includes a bibliography, she doesn’t list Australian services that readers could reach out to.

I found it frighteningly easy to relate to many elements of Gunn’s narratives. Rattled is an honest, thoughtful and impactful memoir that educates and informs.

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Available from Allen & Unwin

Or help support* Book’d Out

*Purchase from Booktopia*

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2022 Nonfiction Reader Challenge Monthly Spotlight #7

 

Welcome to the Monthly Spotlight for the

2022 Nonfiction Reader Challenge!

Each month I’m highlighting some of the reviews shared for the challenge in the linky

Don’t forget to link each book you read as you read during the year!

I encourage you to support all participants who have shared what they are reading for the challenge. Give them a like, leave them a comment, share their posts on Facebook, twitter, or instagram #ReadNonFicChal

—————

IN JULY…

 


[PUBLISHED IN 2022]

Of The Power of Regret by Daniel H Pink, Bibliographic-Manifestations has this to say, “Pink conducted the World Regret Survey (which is still going on) and used the stories he collected there as a data set to analyze the role of regret in our lives. He identified correlations among the various regrets and addresses each type as well as talking about the implications of regret more generally. This was a thought-provoking book and Pink is an excellent writer. Mixing in people’s personal stories with the social-science make this a very readable book.”

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Janette, of the Wicked Witch’s Blog, was disappointed with I Belong Here by Anita Sethi, she writes, “…the actual journey formed a much smaller part of the book than I expected…. descriptions of her walking were constantly interrupted with other thoughts and the chapters seemed to meander between describing her journey, musings on society in general and racism in particular and even to include parts of a dictionary….. I really loved many parts of this book but others just didn’t hold my interest which is a shame as this was a book that I really wanted to like.”

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Over at Maphead’s Book Blog states that Free: A Child and a Country at the End of History by Lea Ypi, “…is definitely worth the hype and should easily make my year-end list of Favorite Nonfiction.” He writes, “What sets Free apart from other memoirs of life under communist rule is you see all this monumental history unfold through the eyes of an innocent child. Over the course of the memoir you learn just how oppressive life was under Albania’s communist overlords…”

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[CELEBRITY]

Revenge: Meghan, Harry and the war between the Windsors by Tom Bower has cemented Laura’s, of Reading Books Again, dislike of the ‘Harkles’. She felt the book offered several surprises that contradicted media coverage and was impressed that, “the last 100 pages of the book are a list of references from where [the author] obtained his information.”

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[MEDICAL MEMOIR]

Katherine Clark was visiting her son’s school, playing tag with some children on the playground. One boy climbed up on the jungle gym and jumped off onto Kate’s head. They both fell to the ground. The boy’s arm was fractured, but Kate’s neck was broken, and she was instantly paralyzed from the neck down. In Where I End: A Story of Tragedy, Truth and Rebellious Hope by Katherine Elizabeth Clark, the author, “…intersperses the details of what happened to her on that fateful day and the aftermath of surgery and physical therapy with reflections of the effects of her injury on her children, the inevitable “why” question, coming to terms with the label “quadriplegic,” wrestling with God’s will and His mysteries, and so on.” BarbaraLee of Stray Thoughts, who recognised some parallels between her own and Kate’s experience“…appreciated Kate’s testimony of God’s grace in hard circumstances.”

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What will you be reading in August?

 

Need some inspiration? Check out these posts

SOCIAL HISTORY and POPULAR SCIENCE

LANGUAGE and MEDICAL MEMOIR

CLIMATE/WEATHER and CELEBRITY

REFERENCE and GEOGRAPHY

LINKED TO A PODCAST and WILD ANIMALS

ECONOMICS and PUBLISHED IN 2022

2022 Nonfiction Reader Challenge Monthly Spotlight #1

2022 Nonfiction Reader Challenge Monthly Spotlight #2

2022 Nonfiction Reader Challenge Monthly Spotlight #3

2022 Nonfiction Reader Challenge Monthly Spotlight #4

2022 Nonfiction Reader Challenge Monthly Spotlight #5

2022 Nonfiction Reader Challenge Monthly Spotlight #6

2022 Nonfiction Reader Challenge Monthly Spotlight #ReadNonFicChal Check out some of the latest #Nonfiction book reviews shared last month #readingchallenge at Book’d Out

2022 Nonfiction Reader Challenge Monthly Spotlight #6

 

Welcome to the Monthly Spotlight for the

2022 Nonfiction Reader Challenge!

Each month I’m highlighting some of the reviews shared for the challenge in the linky

Don’t forget to link each book you read as you read during the year!

I encourage you to support all participants who have shared what they are reading for the challenge. Give them a like, leave them a comment, share their posts on Facebook, twitter, or instagram #ReadNonFicChal

—————

IN JUNE…

 

[PUBLISHED IN 2022]

Carol at Carol’s Notebook says of The Nineties by Chuck Klosterman, “If it was part of the culture during the ’90s, it’s in here….It was a fun combination of a nostalgic walk down memory lane and reassessing how I viewed things then and now.”

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[MEDICAL MEMOIR]

Of My Lobotomy: A Memoir by Howard Dully, (written with Charles Fleming) who was 12 years old when he was subject to an ‘ice-pick’ lobotomy, Stranger Than Fiction writes, “The book is difficult to read at times because of the content, but it also reveals the resiliency and courage that the human spirit is capable of.”

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[CELEBRITY]

Helen at Helen’s Book Blog features Disney animator, Floyd Norman in a post that includes a review of the documentary – Floyd Norman: An Animated Life, Floyd Norman’s autobiography- An Animated Life: A Lifetime of tips, tricks, techniques and stories from an animation Legend, and Disney’s Mickey Mouse in the Barracuda Triangle.

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“This is a brilliant memoir. Brilliant. That’s a word Americans rarely use in this way. But it’s the best word for it.”, begins Hopewell’s Public Library of Life’s review of Sugar & Slate by Charlotte Williams, a memoir of a woman torn between her Welsh and Guyanan heritage.

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Carla Loves To Read combines reviews of Walking with Ghosts by Gabriel Byrne, Ms. Gloria Steinem: A Life by Winifred Conkling and Endurance: Shackleton’s Incredible Voyage by Alfred Lansing, Simon Prebble (Narrator) in a single post.

 

———————

What will you be reading in July?

 

Need some inspiration? Check out these posts

SOCIAL HISTORY and POPULAR SCIENCE

LANGUAGE and MEDICAL MEMOIR

CLIMATE/WEATHER and CELEBRITY

REFERENCE and GEOGRAPHY

LINKED TO A PODCAST and WILD ANIMALS

ECONOMICS and PUBLISHED IN 2022

2022 Nonfiction Reader Challenge Monthly Spotlight #1

2022 Nonfiction Reader Challenge Monthly Spotlight #2

2022 Nonfiction Reader Challenge Monthly Spotlight #3

2022 Nonfiction Reader Challenge Monthly Spotlight #4

2022 Nonfiction Reader Challenge Monthly Spotlight #5

2022 Nonfiction Reader Challenge Monthly Spotlight #ReadNonFicChal Check out some of the latest #Nonfiction book reviews shared last month #readingchallenge at Book’d Out

Review: Scrubbed by Dr. Nikki Stamp

 

Title: Scrubbed

Author: Dr Nikki Stamp

Published: 1st May 2022, Allen & Unwin 

Status: Read May 2022 courtesy Allen & Unwin 

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My Thoughts:

“How did this happen? How did I get here? Hell, how did we all get here? It’s almost unfathomable that a group of people who largely started on this pathway in medicine and surgery could be anything other than kind. After all, we exist every day to make people better. What happens to make people do the exact opposite?”

Scrubbed is an honest and thought-provoking account of Dr Nikki Stamp’s career in medicine and her journey from an idealistic student to a disillusioned surgeon.

Nikki Stamp dreamed of becoming a surgeon from childhood. She endured the hard work of medical school, the punishing regime of residency, and gained a place in the prestigious fellowship program to become one of three female cardiothoracic surgeon’s in Australia, only to step away after twenty odd years to save her sanity.

Dr Stamp is not the only health professional in recent years to draw attention to the problems in the culture of the Australian medical system. I am infuriated and exhausted by the archaic, and often toxic environment, Stamp describes. Not just the prevailing culture of misogyny, but also the unreasonable, and sometimes dangerous practices, passed off as ‘tradition’ that excuses unrealistic expectations, exploitation, harassment and bullying.

I’m not at all surprised that Dr Stamp’s mental health suffered under such unrelenting pressures, and leaving her career is not just a great personal loss for Nikki, but also for those patients who may have otherwise benefited from her hard earned expertise. Such attrition, which it seems is widespread, is shameful, and completely preventable.

While the CoVid pandemic has highlighted funding and staffing problems across the spectrum of health services, from hospitals to general practice, and the stress this places on medical professionals, it’s clear that they are but two of many systemic issues plaguing the service.

I’m glad Dr Stamp has found a new passion, and is happier and healthier for it, but I remain angry at the reluctance of the system to change despite the benefits it would clearly provide to everyone, health professionals, patients and society at large.

++++++++

Available from Allen & Unwin RRP AUD$32.99

Or help support* Book’d Out

*Purchase from Booktopia*

*As an affiliate of Booktopia I may earn a small commission on your purchase at no additional cost to you.*

 

Nonfiction Reader Challenge: Medical memoir

2022 Nonfiction Reader Challenge Monthly Spotlight #5

 

Welcome to the Monthly Spotlight for the

2022 Nonfiction Reader Challenge!

Each month I’m highlighting some of the reviews shared for the challenge in the linky

Don’t forget to link each book you read as you read during the year!

I encourage you to support all participants who have shared what they are reading for the challenge. Give them a like, leave them a comment, share their posts on Facebook, twitter, or instagram #ReadNonFicChal

—————

IN MAY…

 


[WILD ANIMALS]

Stranger Than Fiction read Cod: A Biography of the Fish That Changed the World by Mark Kurlansky, and wrote, “If I ignore that the sub-title of this book is A Biography of the Fish That Changed the World, then I would say it is a very interesting history of the codfish, cod-fishing, fishing vessels, and the businesses that were created related to them. It is written in a very accessible way, sometimes reading like an adventure story.

+++++++++

[SOCIAL HISTORY]

“This book, with it’s details and personal accounts of the day, some previously unpublished, put me right in the middle of the events. This is a powerful book.” writes BookShelfDiscovery of On Bloody Sunday -A New History Of The Day And Its Aftermath – By The People Who Were There by Julieanne Campbell

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[GEOGRAPHY]

Rose by Suzanne Falkiner is the biography of Rose de Freycinet who dressed as a man and stowed away on her husband’s ship, becoming the first woman to circumnavigate the globe, and to leave a record of her adventures. Says DeniseNewtonWrites, “This is a thoroughly researched book and readers get a fascinating insight into how such a voyage was planned and prepared for; maritime traditions and practices in the nineteenth century; questionable (but common) medical practices; the drive to add to scientific and navigational knowledge; the intriguing customs and manners of the people encountered in places such as Brazil, French colonies, ‘New Holland’ (now Australia), the Dutch East Indies (now Indonesia), Guam and the Sandwich Islands (now Hawaii), for example.”

+++++++++

[WILD ANIMALS]

Sue of Book by Book read Six Walks: In the Footsteps of Henry David Thoreau, by Ben Shattuck which she describes as, “a beautifully written memoir that combines nature, travel, literature, and personal experience.”

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[SOCIAL HISTORY]

Blizzard of Glass: The Halifax Explosion of 1917 by Sally M Walker is a book about the collision of two ships in Halifax Harbour that resulted in the deaths of nearly 2,000 people. Bibliographic Manifestations writes, “This is a horrifying event in Canadian history told with compassion and attention to human detail.”

______________

What will you be reading in June?

Need some inspiration? Check out these posts

SOCIAL HISTORY and POPULAR SCIENCE

LANGUAGE and MEDICAL MEMOIR

CLIMATE/WEATHER and CELEBRITY

REFERENCE and GEOGRAPHY

LINKED TO A PODCAST and WILD ANIMALS

ECONOMICS and PUBLISHED IN 2022

2022 Nonfiction Reader Challenge Monthly Spotlight #1

2022 Nonfiction Reader Challenge Monthly Spotlight #2

2022 Nonfiction Reader Challenge Monthly Spotlight #3

2022 Nonfiction Reader Challenge Monthly Spotlight #4

2022 Nonfiction Reader Challenge Monthly Spotlight #4

 

Welcome to the Monthly Spotlight for the

2022 Nonfiction Reader Challenge!

Each month I’m highlighting some of the reviews shared for the challenge in the linky

Don’t forget to link each book you read as you read during the year!

I encourage you to support all participants who have shared what they are reading for the challenge. Give them a like, leave them a comment, share their posts on Facebook, twitter, or instagram #ReadNonFicChal

—————

IN APRIL…

Carols Notebook says, “I am a huge Sherlock Holmes fan which is why On the Trail of Sherlock Holmes [by Stephen Browning] caught my eye. The author sets out a series of walks around London, incorporating locations that feature in stories from the canon and incidents in Conan Doyle’s life. It made me want to go to London and follow the walks and suggested side excursions.”

+++++++++

 

Of All the Living and the Dead by Hayley Campbell, Tracey at Carpe Librum writes, “I admire Hayley Campbell’s courage to shine a light on the often unknown world of death workers and the death industry.” However she also warns, “Just as Campbell felt weighed down by what she learned and experienced, I too began to feel heavy and had to set this book down for a few weeks before returning to it.”

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“This is not a book about Aesop’s fables but rather examining animal behavior….If you are interested in the science and animal behavior this will be enlightening.” writes Tina at Turn the Page about Aesop’s Animals: The Science behind the Fables by Jo Wimpenny

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Will at Coots Reviews offers a thoughtful review of The Lonely Stories edited by Natalie Eve Garrett “Bottom line is that, while the title of this book may suggest it could be a downer, The Lonely Storiesis anything but. It not only connects on an emotional level, but offers a wide range of insight into the human condition. You will laugh and cry, and maybe feel prompted to consider loneliness, or lonely times in your own experience. One thing is for certain. However you react to this book, you will not be alone in that reaction.’

+++++++++

 

Fascinated by the recent discovery of the Endurance—which sunk 107 years ago, Susan at Bloggin’ About Books chose to read Endurance: Shackleton’s Incredible Voyage by Alfred Lansing, she says, “It’s narrative non-fiction at its best, bringing history to life in a way that is not just fascinating, but also engrossing and impactful. I couldn’t stop reading this iconic book.”

 

______________

What will you be reading in April?

Need some inspiration? Check out these posts

SOCIAL HISTORY and POPULAR SCIENCE

LANGUAGE and MEDICAL MEMOIR

CLIMATE/WEATHER and CELEBRITY

REFERENCE and GEOGRAPHY

LINKED TO A PODCAST and WILD ANIMALS

ECONOMICS and PUBLISHED IN 2022

2022 Nonfiction Reader Challenge Monthly Spotlight #1

2022 Nonfiction Reader Challenge Monthly Spotlight #2

2022 Nonfiction Reader Challenge Monthly Spotlight #3

2022 Nonfiction Reader Challenge Monthly Spotlight #3

 

Welcome to the Monthly Spotlight for the

2022 Nonfiction Reader Challenge!

Each month I’m highlighting some of the reviews shared for the challenge in the linky

Don’t forget to link each book you read as you read during the year!

I encourage you to support all participants who have shared what they are reading for the challenge. Give them a like, leave them a comment, share their posts on Facebook, twitter, or instagram #ReadNonFicChal

—————

IN MARCH…


[REFERENCE]

At the Book Stop, Curly Girl has this to say about Laundry Love by Patric Richardson and Karin Miller, “Richardson’s goal is to help us care for our clothing better, but in the process to also help the environment, save time and money, and love our clothes more. That’s a pretty tall order! I’ve already tried a few of his suggestions and the upshot is I’m doing laundry less often and using products with less chemicals, so both of those things make me really happy.”

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[GEOGRAPHY]

Janette of the Wicked Witch’s Blog writes enthusiastically about Islands of Abandonment by Cal Flynn, “I was engrossed by this book and fascinated by the author’s findings. It was quite an easy read, there is some Scientific background but this is perfectly understandable by a non-scientist such as myself. The text is enhanced by photographs of most of the sites but in actual fact, her descriptions are so vivid that you could easily manage without them. The writing is often almost poetic as she wanders around those derelict and abandoned sites.”

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[SOCIAL HISTORY]

I loved Sheilas: Bad Ass Women of Australian History by Eliza Reilly, describing it as, “…a fascinating, inspiring, irreverent celebration of some of Australia’s women who refused to accept the status quo throughout history.  Not content to simply regurgitate the dry facts and figures which are the hallmarks of many history books, Sheilas has a conversational tone, complete with expletives for emphasis. Reilly incorporates on point, funny and occasionally savage personal commentary, tweets and pieces of trivia.”. You can read my review in full here at Book’d Out

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[POPULAR SCIENCE]

“Forget Stephen King.”, writes Sue at Book by Book, “In Bottle of Lies: The Inside Story of the Generic Drug Boom, author and investigative journalist Katherine Eban writes about real-life horror scarier than any of King’s novels! As sometimes happens, my book group chose this book that I wasn’t interested in reading, and as almost always happens, I ended up being glad I’d read it! This engrossing, terrifying nonfiction book opens the door to the generic drug industry’s dirty secrets.”

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[LINKED TO A PODCAST]

Though Carol of Carol’s Notebook first listened to Wine for Normal People: A Guide for Real People Who Like Wine, but Not the Snobbery That Goes with It by, from the creator and host of the popular podcast Wine for Normal People, Elizabeth Schneider on audio, she ended up buying a print copy too. She says, it’s one I can see myself referring back to.

______________

What will you be reading in April?

Looking for something to suit the Celebrity category?

Check out Ten Steps to Nanette by Hannah Gadsby

*As an affiliate of Booktopia I may earn a small commission on your purchase at no additional cost to you.*


Need some inspiration? Check out these posts

SOCIAL HISTORY and POPULAR SCIENCE

LANGUAGE and MEDICAL MEMOIR

CLIMATE/WEATHER and CELEBRITY

REFERENCE and GEOGRAPHY

LINKED TO A PODCAST and WILD ANIMALS

ECONOMICS and PUBLISHED IN 2022

2022 Nonfiction Reader Challenge Monthly Spotlight #1

2022 Nonfiction Reader Challenge Monthly Spotlight #2

Review: Sheilas: Badass Women of Australian History by Eliza Reilly

 

Title: Sheilas: Badass Women of Australian History

Author: Eliza Reilly

Published: 22nd February 2022, Hachette

Status: Read February 2022, Hachette

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My Thoughts:

 

“The Sheilas in these pages are celebrated for the chaos and brilliance they bring, and they deserve to be spun into legend. They have helped me find out who I really am, and I think reading about them is going to give you some clues about who you really are, too.”

Sheilas: Bad Ass Women of Australian History is a fascinating, inspiring, irreverent celebration of some of Australia’s women who refused to accept the status quo throughout history, by writer, director and performer, Eliza Reilly.

Building on the (must watch) ‘Sheilas: Badass Women of Australian History’ comedy webisode series Eliza created with her sister Hannah, developed as a part of Screen Australia‘s initiative called Gender Matters in 2018 (available on YouTube), the book ‘Sheilas: Badass Women of Australian History’ introduces a bushranger and suffragettes, swimmers and pilots, a spy and an artist, among others. I was disappointed in myself to realise how few names I recognised.

Not content to simply regurgitate the dry facts and figures which are the hallmarks of many history books, Sheilas has a conversational tone, complete with expletives for emphasis. Reilly incorporates on point, funny and occasionally savage personal commentary, tweets and pieces of trivia. Her flippancy won’t appeal to everyone but I think it’s more likely to capture the attention of a wide audience than any history textbook. Photographs and ephemera support each story, while the illustrated titles for each woman, designed by Regine Abos, are whimsical and witty.

Here are a few notes on just three of the incredible Sheilas in the book…

Mary Ann Bugg

“There probably isn’t a better example of white Australia’s bad habit of holding up a grubby man as a hero and discarding a woman of colour who was literally doing the exact same shit but better than the story of the overlooked bushranger and her illiterate white boyfriend who was there too.”

Captain Thunderbolt (aka Frederick Ward) may be remembered for having the longest bushranging career in New South Wales, but it wouldn’t have been possible without Mary Ann Bugg, a Worimi woman who swam the shark-infested Sydney harbour with a metal file between her teeth to liberate her boyfriend from his prison cell on Cockatoo Island. When she finally tired of Fred’s company, she remarried and became a nurse.

Catherine Hay Thomson

“…very real and very scary grounds for being locked up included: ‘Laziness’,‘Masturbation, ‘Medicine to prevent conception’, ‘Mental excitement’, ‘Novel reading’ and practising ‘Egotism’. Which sounds more like my daily to-do list than a justification for insanity.”

Like her well known American counterpart Nellie Bly, Australian journalist, Catherine Hay Thomson, admitted herself to Kew Asylum in Melbourne to expose the abuse and corruption rife within the institution. In 1886 alone, Catherine published five stories on the Melbourne hospital. Her articles resulted in formal nursing training being introduced in Victoria and a ‘Ladies’ committee’ being imposed to help patients.

Deborah Lawrie

“Ansett went on to name The Period as enemy number one, pleading that people with periods should legally be banned from flying because they would ‘act strangely every month, simply were medically unfit once a month, “out of action”’.

Deborah Lawrie refused to take no for an answer when Ansett Airlines repeatedly rejected her application to become an airline pilot. In what was the first case ever held before the Equal Opportunity Board, Deborah won, At the direction of Ansett Airlines owner, Sir Reginald Ansett, the result was appealed to first the Supreme Court, and when they upheld the ruling of the EOB, to the High Court of Australia, where the court directed Ansett Airlines to hire Deborah after a two year legal battle. Sir Reg was so affronted he stood down as CEO and unlike the now defunct airline, Deborah is still flying today, a fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society and a master air pilot.


Read Sheilas: Badass Women of Australian History to learn about sheroes including Faith Bandler, Nancy Wake, Fanny Durack. This is informative, hilarious, and badass.

 

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Available to purchase from PanMacmillan Australia

Or your preferred retailer

2022 Nonfiction Reader Challenge Monthly Spotlight #2

 

Welcome to the Monthly Spotlight for the

2022 Nonfiction Reader Challenge!

Each month I’m highlighting some of the reviews shared for the challenge in the linky

Don’t forget to link each book you read as you read during the year!

I encourage you to support all participants who have shared what they are reading for the challenge. Give them a like, leave them a comment, share their posts on Facebook, twitter, or instagram #ReadNonFicChal

Need some inspiration? Check out these posts

SOCIAL HISTORY and POPULAR SCIENCE

LANGUAGE and MEDICAL MEMOIR

CLIMATE/WEATHER and CELEBRITY

REFERENCE and GEOGRAPHY

LINKED TO A PODCAST and WILD ANIMALS

ECONOMICS and PUBLISHED IN 2022

2022 Nonfiction Reader Challenge Monthly Spotlight #1

—————

IN FEBRUARY…

[ECONOMICS]

 

On The Lonely Century: How to Restore Human Connection in a World That’s Pulling Apart by Noreen Hertz, Bookshelf Discoveries writes, “I found this a fascinating book,  incredibly well researched and full of interesting anecdotes, interviews and statistics.”

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[RELATED TO A PODCAST]

 

Barbara of Stray Thoughts enjoyed  The Middle Matters: Why That (Extra)Ordinary Life Looks Really Good on You by Lisa Jo Baker which, “discusses the impact of our middle years in eight areas: our bodies, marriage, parenting (which gets two chapters), our homes, failures, friendship, and faith.” Lisa Jo Baker cohosts a podcast Christie Purifoy called Out of the Ordinary.

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[GEOGRAPHY]

 

“There are just so many interesting facts here. I loved poring over these pages.“ Jen at the Introverted Reader writes of North American Maps for Curious Minds: 100 New Ways to See the Continent by Matthew Bucklan & Victor Cizek Illustrated by: Jack Dunnington

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[SOCIAL HISTORY]

 

Carla of Carla Loves to Read shares her thoughts about four ‘animated readings’ related to Black History aimed at children,  Let the Children March by Monica Clark-Robinson Illustrate by Frank Morrison, Unspeakable: The Tulsa Race Massacre by Carole Boston Weatherford, Illustrated by Floyd Cooper, Schomburg: The Man Who Built a Library by Carole Boston Weatherford Illustrated by Eric Velasquez, and William Still and His Freedom Stories: The Father of the Underground Railroad by Don Tate

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[PUBLISHED IN 2022]

 

From The Bashful Bookworm comes a review for Drop Acid by David Perlmutter, she writes, “I found this book gives the reader a good scientific background of the role of uric acid, told in a way that most readers can understand.  And the book gives a good solid way for readers to lower uric acid levels using diet and supplements.”.

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What will you be reading in March?


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2022 Nonfiction Reader Challenge Monthly Spotlight #1 #ReadNonFicChal #ReadingChallenge #Nonfiction #Economics #SocialHistory #Geography #RelatedtoaPodcast #Publishedin2022

2022 Nonfiction Reader Challenge Monthly Spotlight #1

 

Welcome to the Monthly Spotlight for the 2022 Nonfiction Reader Challenge!

Each month I’m highlighting some of the reviews shared for the challenge in the linky, some participants are off to a flying start already! 

Don’t forget to link each book you read as you read during the year!

I encourage you to support all participants who have shared what they are reading for the challenge. Give them a like, leave them a comment, share their posts on Facebook, twitter, or instagram #ReadNonFicChal

Need some inspiration? Check out these posts

SOCIAL HISTORY and POPULAR SCIENCE

LANGUAGE and MEDICAL MEMOIR

CLIMATE/WEATHER and CELEBRITY

REFERENCE and GEOGRAPHY

LINKED TO A PODCAST and WILD ANIMALS

ECONOMICS and PUBLISHED IN 2022

—————

IN JANUARY

[GEOGRAPHY]

From Tracey at Carpe Librum ,“Adrift in Melbourne by Robyn Annear is highly recommended for history lovers, non fiction readers and those with even a passing interest in Australian history and the evolution of Melbourne, Victoria.”

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[WILD ANIMALS]

Of The Puma Years by Laura Coleman, Curly Geek at The Book Stop writes, “I loved this memoir about Coleman’s time working in a wildlife sanctuary in Bolivia. It was completely different from anything I’ve read before, and I enjoy reading about people who do things that I’ll never have the courage to do.”

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[MEDICAL MEMOIR]

“This medical memoir by Dr. James Cole drops you into the hectic and unpredictable life of a trauma surgeon… is a fast paced and realistic accounting.” says Tina of Turn the Page about Trauma: My Life as an Emergency Surgeon by Dr. James Cole

 

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[CELEBRITY]

Mary of Bibliographic Manifestations says of Blowing the Bloody Doors Off: And Other Lessons in Life by Michael Caine, “I enjoyed the book; Caine’s writing style is very chatty and appealing.”

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[POPULAR SCIENCE]

In Praise of Walking by Shane O’Mara, “…was a bit harder work than I was expecting as there was a lot more Science detail than I had anticipated…. Mainly though I did enjoy it and found it an interesting and informative read.” writes Janette of Wicked Witch’s Blog.

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What will you be reading in February ?


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