2020 Nonfiction Reader Challenge: Monthly Spotlight #9


I’m delighted with the response to the inaugural Nonfiction Reader Challenge, and I hope you’ll join me again next year…you will be able to sign up for 2021 near the end of this month.

I’d welcome your suggestions for next year’s category’s, please comment below!

If you hadn’t yet noticed, I’ve created a permanent page for the challenge, you can CLICK HERE, or select the menu link at top left.

The Linky to add your review to can be found there. This new link will remain active for the rest for the year’s submissions. Look for the text in orange, or CLICK HERE

On the first Saturday of each month, I highlight a handful of Linky submissions, but I encourage you to support all participants who have shared what they have been reading for the challenge. Give them a like, leave them a comment, share their posts on twitter, Facebook or instagram #2020ReadNonFic

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In October …

Carol from ReadingLadies writes “Overall, The Salt Path is an inspiring, realistic, dramatic, and well-written memoir. Fans of extreme hiking and outdoor enthusiasts will especially enjoy the story. Readers who live in the area and who have had an opportunity to walk part of the trail will certainly appreciate it!”

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“Hidden Valley Road is an outstanding book and should easily make my year-end list of favorite nonfiction. Please consider it highly recommended.”, writes Maphead’s Book Blog

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Of Anti Racist Ally by Sophie Williams, DeniseNewtonWrites states, “This is literally a pocket sized book. Don’t let its diminutive size fool you, though. At a time when painful truths about racism in the past and the present are being confronted world-wide, Anti Racist Ally gives some sound advice for anyone who wants to be able to do more than watch #BlackLivesMatter protests on TV news or bemoan the shocking rates of Black deaths in custody.”

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Have you completed your challenge goal?

Please share your link to the COMPLETED challenge Linky HERE (look for the green text) or CLICK HERE

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I’m currently participating in Nonfiction November hosted by Hosted by DoingDeweyDecimal, JulzReads, What’s NonFiction, and Shelf Aware. You can learn more about it HERE , it may be just the motivation you need to meet your Nonfiction Reader Challenge goal!

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What will you be reading in November?

Click here to see what else other participants have been reading!

In case you missed it….

2020 Nonfiction Reader Challenge: Monthly Spotlight #8

2020 Nonfiction Reader Challenge: Monthly Spotlight #7

2020 Nonfiction Reader Challenge: Monthly Spotlight #6

2020 Nonfiction Reader Challenge: Monthly Spotlight #5

2020 Nonfiction Reader Challenge: Monthly Spotlight #4

2020 Nonfiction Reader Challenge: Monthly Spotlight #3

2020 Nonfiction Reader Challenge: Monthly Spotlight #2

2020 Nonfiction Reader Challenge: Monthly Spotlight #1

2020 Nonfiction Reader Challenge Recommendations Part 1 #Memoir #DisasterEvent #Social Science #Related to An Occupation

2020 Nonfiction Reader Challenge Recommendations Part 2 #History #Feminism #Psychology #Social Science

2020 Nonfiction Reader Challenge Recommendations Part 3 #Nature #True Crime #Science #Published in 2020

Review: Dr. Karl’s Surfing Through Science by Dr Karl Kruszelnicki


Title: Dr Karl’s Surfing Through Science

Author: Dr Karl Kruszelnicki

Published: 29th October 2020, ABC Books

Status: Read November 2020 courtesy BFredericksPR

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My Thoughts:

Few a Australians would be unfamiliar with the multi-talented and slightly eccentric, enthusiastic champion of science, Dr Karl Kruszelnicki. With degrees in Physics and Maths, Biomedical Engineering, Medicine, and Surgery, he is a media host, an author of over 30 books, and a Fellow at UTS.

Dr Karl’s Surfing Through Science is an informative, and entertaining, exploration of specific subjects within varied branches of science. With topics ranging from Coffee-Grinding the Perfect Cup, to Past Plagues and Coronavirus, from Black Holes Have No Size, to The Amazing Disappearing Anus, there is truly something for everyone.

Dr Karl’s enthusiasm for the subjects comes across, as does his ‘dad’ sense of humour, but without compromising the information. The text is well presented, providing concise explanation and details, with the minimum use of jargon. Sub headings help with organisation, and inset columns offer additional but still relevant information. The accompanying images and illustrations are clear and relevant. I found the large format paperback easy to handle, and the pages are a pleasing thickness.

Not content to wow his readers with science fact, Dr Karl has introduced science fiction into his latest book. By downloading an app and hovering over the title pages of each topic with a smartphone or tablet, a ‘hologram’ of Dr Karl appears and talks about some of the chapter’s key ideas. It’s a fun and unique element of the book that will especially appeal to primary school aged children. Question marks also appear on the screen, and tapping them leads to additional relevant information online, which will benefit teens or adults interested in further detail (I’ve included a short demonstration video below). This clever feature also allows Dr Karl to provides updates on the information in the book, if necessary. The only downside, as such, to the augmented reality feature is that it does require an internet connection and an up-to-date Apple or Android device (with minimum OS requirements) to access these interactive elements, though the book is perfectly useful and entertaining without it.

Dr Karl’s Surfing Through Science would be a stellar gift for a budding scientist, or really anyone with a curious mind who might wonder are Murder Hornets – Lethal But Tasty?

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Available from ABC Books and HarperCollins Australia

Or from your preferred retailer via Booko I Book Depository

2020 Nonfiction Reader Challenge: Monthly Spotlight #8

I’m delighted with the response to the inaugural Nonfiction Reader Challenge so far, and since sign-ups are open until December 1st, a few more may decide to join us during the year.

If you hadn’t yet noticed, I’ve created a permanent page for the challenge, you can CLICK HERE, or select the menu link at top left.

The Linky to add your review to can be found there. This new link will remain active for the rest for the year’s submissions. Look for the text in orange.

On the first Saturday of each month, I will be highlighting a handful of Linky submissions, but I encourage you to support all participants who have shared what they have been reading for the challenge. Give them a like, leave them a comment, share their posts on twitter, Facebook or instagram #2020ReadNonFic

 

In September…

 

Maya at Bookshelf Life strongly recommends The Twins of Auschwitz by Eva Mozes Kor. She found it to be an absolutely heart breaking story, but an important learning experience.

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In Lucid Dreaming Made Easy – A Beginner’s Guide to Waking Up in Your Dreams by Charlie Morely, Tracey of Carpe Librum discovered, “… there’s sooooo much more to lucid dreaming and I’ve only been scratching the surface.”

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To Sir With Love [by E.R.Braithwaite] is an inspiring and articulate true account of a man who rose above bitterness, dealt with his own arrogance and prejudice, and enabled a bunch of feral teenagers to embark on adult life with dignity and hope. A book well worth reading and a great story for a future (or present) teacher to immerse themselves in.” writes Carol from Journey-and-Destination

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Anjana at Superfluous Reading read The Case of the Vanishing Blonde: And Other True Crime Stories by Mark Bowden. Of the six articles included, she preferred the ‘ straightforward investigative cases’

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“There are stories in this examination of domestic abuse in Australia that will never leave my mind. They are horrific, and Hill’s telling of them is powerful. Some chapters stand out, in particular the section on Indigenous Australians.” Writes Kate of BooksAreMyFavouriteandBest about See What You Made Me Do by Jess Hill

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Do any of these interest you? What will you be reading in October?

Click here to see what else other participants have been reading!

In case you missed it….

2020 Nonfiction Reader Challenge: Monthly Spotlight #7

2020 Nonfiction Reader Challenge: Monthly Spotlight #6

2020 Nonfiction Reader Challenge: Monthly Spotlight #5

2020 Nonfiction Reader Challenge: Monthly Spotlight #4

2020 Nonfiction Reader Challenge: Monthly Spotlight #3

2020 Nonfiction Reader Challenge: Monthly Spotlight #2

2020 Nonfiction Reader Challenge: Monthly Spotlight #1

2020 Nonfiction Reader Challenge Recommendations Part 1 #Memoir #DisasterEvent #Social Science #Related to An Occupation

2020 Nonfiction Reader Challenge Recommendations Part 2 #History #Feminism #Psychology #Social Science

2020 Nonfiction Reader Challenge Recommendations Part 3 #Nature #True Crime #Science #Published in 2020

Review: A Woman of Force by Mark Morri

Title: A Woman of Force

Author: Mark Morri

Published: 22nd September 2020, Macmillan Australia

Status: Read September 2020 courtesy Macmillan/Netgalley

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My Thoughts:

A Woman of Force is ‘The True Story of Deborah Wallace, the Cop Known as The Gangbuster’, penned by veteran journalist/crime writer, Mark Morri.

Illustrating Deborah Wallace’s remarkable thirty six year career as a NSW police officer, from general duties street cop to Detective Superintendent in charge of Strike Force Raptor, a specialised unit which played a major role in dismantling the state’s most dangerous bikie gangs, this a fascinating biography of a woman’s success in a unique role.

Beginning her career in Blacktown in 1983, Deborah enjoyed community policing and thought she would remain a uniform cop but after being invited to assist in the task force investigating the high profile case involving Anita Cobby’s shocking rape and murder (she was the police woman who re-enacted Anita’s journey towards home that night for the media), she earned her detective credentials just three years later.

I may actually have crossed paths with Deborah during her next assignment in Cabramatta when I worked in the suburb from 1994-1996. While she earned the nickname ‘Madam’, I was called ‘Missy’ by my exclusively Chinese and Vietnamese preschoolers and their family’s. I was well aware of the crime that plagued the area, we had to check the grounds and the sandpit each morning for used syringes or weapons that may have been thrown over the fence.

From Cabramatta, Wallace moved up to the South East Asian Crime Squad before taking command of The Middle Eastern Organised Crime Squad in 2008, and then the Gang Squad in 2014, which also brought Strike Force Raptor under her leadership. I found her experiences, -sometimes exciting, often dangerous, and occasionally surprising-, within these units, to be engrossing,.

Wallace presents as intelligent, compassionate, resourceful, tough and dedicated. Though she was not immune from some targeted harassment (possibly more from professional jealousy than just plain sexism), it’s also clear that she readily attracted respect from the majority of her colleagues by proving herself to be a strong and supportive leader.

Personal details are sprinkled lightly through the book, including how Deborah met her husband, a little about her family, her friendships with Anita Cobby’s mother and Father Chris Reilly, and her involvement in organisations related to supporting youth, but the focus is on her career.

Deborah Wallace had an extraordinary career and I admire her significant contributions to the prevention, and curtailing, of crime. Interesting, and entertaining, I enjoyed reading A Woman of Force.

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Available from PanMacmillan Australia

Or from your preferred retailer via Booko I Book Depository

Review: The CSIRO Low-carb Diabetes Diet Lifestyle Solution by Professor Grant Brinkworth & Dr. Pennie Taylor

Title: The CSIRO Low-carb Diabetes Diet Lifestyle Solution

Author: Professor Grant Brinkworth & Dr. Pennie Taylor

Published: August 25th 2020, Macmillan Australia

Status: Read August 2020 courtesy PanMacmillan Australia

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My Thoughts:

 

The CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation) is a trusted Australian institution responsible for innovations including WiFi, plastic banknotes, the Hendra virus vaccine and even Aerogard. The CSIRO Low-carb Diabetes Diet Lifestyle Solution is the fourth book in a series developed by the health researchers of CSIRO which aims to provide a practical guide, backed by science, for individuals to looking to implement a healthy, low-carb, lifestyle.

This particular volume is geared towards those who have, or are at risk of developing, a diabetic condition. Around 1.7 million Australians have diabetes and 280 Australians develop diabetes every day. A large number of those will be diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, which can be managed, and even prevented, with lifestyle changes that include a healthy eating plan and exercise.

In The CSIRO Low-carb Diabetes Diet Lifestyle Solution the authors begin with an overview of Type 2 diabetes, its causes – including risk factors; and its effects – on both society, and the individual.

The second section presents the science that the CSIRO used to develop the plans and recipes in the book, and the outcome of their trial on individuals health, which is reassuring for those concerned with evidence based success.

For someone newly diagnosed with diabetes, or its warning signs, the changes required to their diet can be overwhelming. Along with information on choosing your optimal kilojoule requirements, and pictorials to help you understand how a diet plan can be built using a units based method, sections three and four aim to assist by providing twelve comprehensive weekly meal plans (plus shopping lists) and 75+ recipes.

Divided into meal periods, Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner (by protein), each recipe includes ingredients and method along with serving size, preparation time, cooking time and difficulty level, perfect for cooks of all ability. The recipe also provides information about the units per serve, and the number of carbs is highlighted. Full colour, attractive photographs accompany the majority of recipes. A layout example, and sample recipe is below:

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Extract from The CSIRO Low-Carb Diabetes Diet & Lifestyle Solution by Professor Grant Brinkworth and Dr Pennie Taylor. Macmillan Australia, RRP $36.99, Available 25th August. Photography by Rob Palmer. Click here to LOOK INSIDE the book.

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Physical activity plays an important role in preventing, and managing diabetes. The final section of the book provides information on safely integrating exercise into your lifestyle, and provides photographic examples of several low impact exercises that can enhance your success when paired with the meal plan.

I think The CSIRO Low-carb Diabetes Diet Lifestyle Solution would be an ideal purchase, or gift, for someone newly diagnosed with diabetes, though even if you aren’t affected by the disease, the meal plan and recipes in the book would also be beneficial for those seeking low carb menu options, to lose weight, or improve their general health.

 

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Available from PanMacmillan Australia

Or from your preferred retailer via Booko I Book Depository

Review: Bush School by Peter O’Brien

 

Title: Bush School

Author: Peter O’Brien

Published: August 4th 2020, Allen & Unwin

Status: Read August 2020 courtesy Allen & Unwin

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My Thoughts:

In his engaging memoir, Bush School, Peter O’Brien recalls his two years as the teacher of a one-room school in Weabonga, a tiny farming village two days’ travel by train and mail cart from Armidale.

In 1960, aged just twenty years old with barely more than year of teaching experience, Peter was asked to fulfil his rural teaching service requirement and encouraged by the Education Department Inspector, after a false start in Guy Fawkes, to select one of NSW’s remote regions on the western lip of the Great Divide. After an uncomfortable journey, and a worrying introduction to his lodgings, Peter found himself welcoming eighteen students, ranging in age from five years to fifteen, to Weabonga School.

I could not imagine, as a new graduate with limited teaching experience, being placed in sole charge of a schoolhouse, far from everything familiar, with children of varying grades (an experience my mother shared in early 1970’s, but thankfully I escaped in early 1990’s). Peter’s experience may not be unique, but it’s seldom shared and a pi

The first-person narrative is an easy and accessible read, and though I did find the tone slightly formal, there is also a genuine sense of warmth. Peter writes of the challenges and triumphs of his new environment. Professionally he has concerns about his limited experience, his inability to consult with colleagues or a mentor, and the lack of available educational resources, but luckily his pupils prove enthusiastic, and his instinct for a child centered, or ‘open learning’, approach to teaching, serves him well. Personally Peter’s living situation, a spare, paper lined single bedroom in the home of a student where he took his meagre meals alone exacerbated his homesickness, and he was on the verge of giving notice until he received an alternate offer of accomodation. The separation from his sweetheart, who later become his wife, also weighed on his mind.

Bush School is a winsome, interesting and entertaining memoir. As a teacher, I found Peter’s explanation of his pedagogical development interesting, particularly since his theories closely mirror my own, which is why I prefer to work in early childhood education. As someone interested in social history I appreciated his effort to contextualise his experience, and that of his students, amid wider Australian societal events and issues. As a generally curious reader I enjoyed Peter’s affectionate reminisces of unfamiliar people and places.

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Available from Allen & Unwin RRP AUD$29.99

Or from your preferred retailer via Booko I Book Depository

Review: Reasonable Doubt by Xanthé Mallett

 

Title: Reasonable Doubt

Author: Xanthé Mallett

Published: July 28th 2020, Macmillan Australia

Status: Read August 2020, courtesy Pan Macmillan Australia

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My Thoughts:

In Reasonable Doubt forensic anthropologist and criminologist Xanthé Mallett examines the flaws in the Australian criminal justice system that have contributed to five wrongful murder convictions, and a shocking legal scandal whose repercussions will likely see the guilty go free.

Reasonable Doubt is not intended as an indictment of the system as a whole, Mallett’s focus is on the failures of law that lead to a wrongful conviction, irrespective of the innocence or guilt of the accused. She presents an intelligent and thoughtful study of its weaknesses, which range from poor police investigative processes, to unreliable evidence, to corruption, resulting in convictions that ostensibly contradict the intent of justice.

While I’ve always accepted miscarriages of justice happen, I was still shocked to learn just how badly things can go wrong, and how difficult it is to correct those mistakes. The case studies presented span the country, and involve alleged perpetrators from different socioeconomic backgrounds and races. I was only vaguely familiar with two of them but found each case fascinating.

Mallett’s research appears to be meticulous and impartial, based on her investigation of the facts available. She includes information from experts in their fields to explain relevant legal concepts or provide further forensic detail.

With its accessible narrative, and thought-provoking and fascinating subject, Reasonable Doubt is a must read for fans of the true crime genre, or anyone with interest in the Australian legal system.

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Available from Pan Macmillan Australia

Or from your preferred retailer via Booko I Book Depository

2020 Nonfiction Reader Challenge: Monthly Spotlight #7

I’m delighted with the response to the inaugural Nonfiction Reader Challenge so far, and since sign-ups are open until December 1st, a few more may decide to join us during the year.

If you hadn’t yet noticed, I’ve created a permanent page for the challenge, you can CLICK HERE, or select the menu link at top left.

The Linky to add your review to can be found there. This new link will remain active for the rest for the year’s submissions. Look for the text in orange.

On the first Saturday of each month, I will be highlighting a handful of Linky submissions, but I encourage you to support all participants who have shared what they have been reading for the challenge. Give them a like, leave them a comment, share their posts on twitter, Facebook or instagram #2020ReadNonFic

 

JULY

 

 

In a single post at The Cue Card, Susan reviews three nonfiction books. The first is a short memoir, that she found so fascinating she listened to twice, A Bookshop in Berlin: The Rediscovered Memoir of One Woman’s Harrowing Escape From the Nazis by Francoise Frenkel. The second is She Came to Slay: The Life and Times of Harriet Tubman by Erica Armstrong Dunbar. The third, The Hidden Life of Owls: The Science and Spirit of Nature’s Most Elusive Birds by Leigh Calvez gave Susan a new appreciation for them.

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Jo at BookloverBookReviews recommends Joanna Cannon’s Breaking & Mending unreservedly. She writes, “The striking honesty and authenticity with which she interrogates her own thinking and responses to situations, and how that changed, during her journey from aspiring student of medicine to fully-fledged doctor, will move even the most hardened of souls. The tears rolled for me.”

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At Book’d Out I posted a review of The Cold Vanish: Seeking the Missing in North America’s Wildlands by Jon Billman this month. I counted it towards the Nature category though it could also work for True Crime. “With a well organised, well researched, and accessible narrative, Billman effectively communicates the facts, but also ensures the humanity of his subjects is never forgotten.”

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At Journey and Destination, Carol reviewed Queen Victoria by Lucy Worsley. She wrote, “This was a good introduction to the life of Queen Victoria and I liked the ‘twenty-four day’ approach as it helped to give an overview of her life in general. The author presents Queen Victoria as a complex person with faults and eccentricities but also as a person who was affectionate and sympathetic.”

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Maphead Book Blog has reviewed several nonfiction titles in the past month, but it’s of The Future Is History: How Totalitarianism Reclaimed Russia that he calls, “…an outstanding book, and a must read for anyone wanting to understand Putin’s Russia.” He writes, “Not only will it make my 2020 list of favorite nonfiction it’s also one of the best books I’ve read this year.”

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Do any of these interest you? What will you be reading in August?

Click here to see what else other participants have been reading!

 

In case you missed it….

2020 Nonfiction Reader Challenge: Monthly Spotlight #6

2020 Nonfiction Reader Challenge: Monthly Spotlight #5

2020 Nonfiction Reader Challenge: Monthly Spotlight #4

2020 Nonfiction Reader Challenge: Monthly Spotlight #3

2020 Nonfiction Reader Challenge: Monthly Spotlight #2

2020 Nonfiction Reader Challenge: Monthly Spotlight #1

2020 Nonfiction Reader Challenge Recommendations Part 1 #Memoir #DisasterEvent #Social Science #Related to An Occupation

2020 Nonfiction Reader Challenge Recommendations Part 2 #History #Feminism #Psychology #Social Science

2020 Nonfiction Reader Challenge Recommendations Part 3 #Nature #True Crime #Science #Published in 2020

Review: The Cold Vanish by Jon Billman

 

Title: The Cold Vanish: Seeking the Missing in North America’s Wildlands

Author: Jon Billman

Published: July 7th 2020, Grand Central Publishing

Status: Read July 2020 courtesy Grand Central Publishing/Netgalley

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My Thoughts:

 

“A person isn’t missing until they’re reported missing. Even then, if you’re over eighteen years old, going missing isn’t a crime or even an emergency.”

Conservative estimates put the number of missing persons whose last known location was somewhere in the wildlands of the United States at 1,600. I was astonished to learn that no one really keeps track of how many people have disappeared in the mountains, parks, forests, scrub or deserts across the country, and as such the real number is likely quite higher.

Some of the people reported missing may eventually found alive, perhaps disorientated, injured, or even living a new life elsewhere. Others may be recovered deceased days, weeks, months, even years after they disappeared, having met with some kind of misadventure. Some are never seen nor heard of again. Of particular interest to Billman are those cases where someone disappears under circumstances that suggest they should be easily found, like Jacob Gray, or conversely those that are found, alive or dead, after an improbable period or in unlikely locations, like Casey Hathaway.

Billman details a number of cases in The Cold Vanish, gathering information from relatives and/or friends, law enforcement officials, search and rescue personnel, and other interested parties. One of these is the case of Jacob Gray which the author repeatedly returns to throughout the narrative.

For seventeen months after Jacob Gray went missing in 2017, his red bicycle and hiking gear found by a river near the Olympic National Park in Washington, his father searched, traversing miles of river, trails, and streets both near and far from where he was last seen. Left in an agony of limbo, he was willing to consider every possible fate for his son from a mundane slip and fall, to abduction by a cult or a serial killer, to an encounter with a Bigfoot, if it meant he would find some answers. He followed up on every clue from vague sightings to psychic predictions.

Billman examines the factors that influence searches, not only delays in reporting but also, unsurprisingly, terrain and weather, as well as search personnel experience, bureaucracy, funding, and jurisdictional conflicts. The average official search period for a missing person in wild areas is five days, and the resources available vary widely between locations. Billman interviews expert trackers, search dog handlers, divers and advocates, and writes of his own participation in searches for the missing, accompanying both officials and volunteers.

With a well organised, well researched, and accessible narrative, Billman effectively communicates the facts, but also ensures the humanity of his subjects is never forgotten. I found The Cold Vanish to be both a fascinating and frightening read.

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Available from Grand Central Publishing

Or from your preferred retailer via Booko I Book Depository I Indiebound

Review: The First Time He Hit Her by Heidi Lemon

Title: The First Time He Hit Her: The shocking true story of the murder of Tara Costigan, the woman next door.

Author: Heidi Lemon

Published: June 30th 2020, Hachette Australia

Status: Read July 2020 courtesy Hachette Australia

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My Thoughts:

Twenty-eight-year-old Tara Costigan was one of 103 women who died violently as a result of family violence–related homicide* in Australia during 2015. The hardworking, loving, mother was holding her newborn daughter in her arms when her ex-partner swung an axe at her neck, her two young sons looking on in horror.

Author Heidi Lemon was shocked by the bare details of the murder reported in the news and made contact with Tara’s uncle, Michael Costigan, a few months later. She spent two and a half years writing The First Time He Hit Her in the hope of understanding the tragedy, and bringing awareness to the relationship between verbal abuse and intimate partner homicide.

“He’ll go ballistic,” [Tara] conceded, “but he won’t hurt me. He’s never hit me.”

Marcus Rappel had never posed a physical threat to Tara until that fateful day. In recent months Marcus had become paranoid, most likely due to anabolic steroid and Ice use, and grown increasingly emotionally and verbally abusive, berating her for hours over imagined infidelities and slights. Tara held on to the hope that the man she fell in love with would reappear until at eight months pregnant she could no longer endure Marcus’s behaviour and asked him to leave. Despite already being embroiled in a new relationship with an ex-girlfriend (the mother of his first child who was also now pregnant), Marcus continued to harass Tara. A few days after Tara gave birth to Ayla she successfully applied for a DVO, and on the day it was served Marcus used an axe to break down Tara’s front door.

During her own experience in a verbally abusive relationship, Lemon failed to recognise it as a form of domestic violence, because she never felt that she was physically at risk. She was shocked to learn during her research for this book that in an estimated quarter of cases of intimate partner homicide there had been no physical violence before the murder. It’s a startling find that contradicts our misconceptions about the danger emotional and verbal abusers pose to their victim.

“Control, then, is the link between all forms of abuse, including murder. The very same appetite for control lies beneath the invisible forms of violence and the single act of violence that will result in someone’s death.”

The First Time He Hit Her is a thought-provoking examination of domestic violence in Australia, a devastating tale of murder, and a moving portrait of a life taken too soon.

If you or someone you know (in Australia) has experienced any kind of abuse, sexual assault, domestic or family violence, please call 1800RESPECT (1800 737 732) or visit their website to chat online.

If you’re concerned about your own behaviour and would like support or information (in Australia), please call MensLine on 1300 78 99 78 or visit their website.

* https://www.saferresource.org.au/the_evidence

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Available from Hachette Australia

Or from your preferred retailer via Booko I Book Depository

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