Its Monday! What Are You Reading? #SundaySalon #SundayPost

 

Linking to: It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? at BookDate; Sunday Post @ Caffeinated Reviewer; and the Sunday Salon @ ReaderBuzz

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Life…

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I’m relieved to report that my town escaped the flooding that caused devastation along the eastern coast of Australia. You may have seen that after the destruction caused in northern New South Wales, that the rain bomb my region was expecting earlier this past week skirted us and instead hit most of metropolitan Sydney, causing higher flood levels in the area my daughter is living for uni, and near drowning complete suburbs, the problem worsened by the reservoirs around the city spilling from overfill. Until the threat of further storms had passed and the waters started falling again midweek, I was pretty stressed. Now I’m just angry at our current government’s penny-pinching response.

There are a ton of fundraising efforts, one of which I thought I’d bring to your attention because you get something when you give. Hosted by BAD Sydney, authors Candice Fox, Chris Hammer and Michael Robotham will be talking books with ABC broadcaster, Kate Evans in person and online on the 1st April, raising funds for the Lismore Library. If you can attend in person, you can join them at the State Library of NSW at 6.00pm. You can also join the Zoom livestream online from anywhere in the world. Tickets are AUD$20 (about US$14 or UK£11 or 12EUR). CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE


Now I can go back to just worrying about catching CoVid as cases rise, especially as medical studies have just confirmed that not only your risk of a heart attack almost doubles in the 12 months after an even a mild infection, your brain literally shrinks too, and of course Putin with his finger on the big red nuclear button.

How are all you doing?

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What I’ve Read Since I last Posted…

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The Mother by Jane Caro

Brunswick Street Blues by Sally Bothroyd

When We Fall by Aoife Clifford

A Family of Strangers by Fiona Lowe

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New Posts…

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Review: Sheilas: Badass Women of Australian History by Eliza Reilly

Review: The Kitchen Front by Jennifer Ryan

Review: Nine Lives by Peter Swanson

Review: The Mother by Jane Caro

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What I’m Reading This Week…


The thrilling finale of the groundbreaking Caleb Zelic series, from the award-winning author of Resurrection Bay

Caleb Zelic can’t hear you. But he can see everything.

Caleb’s addict brother, Anton, has been missing for months, still angry about Caleb’s part in his downfall.

After almost giving up hope of finding him, Caleb receives an anonymous message alerting him to Ant’s whereabouts and warning him that Ant is in danger. A man has been shot and Ant might be next.

Caleb reluctantly leaves his pregnant wife’s side and tracks his brother to an isolated island where Ant has been seeking treatment. There, he finds a secretive community under threat from a sniper, and a cult-like doctor with a troubling background.

Caleb must hunt for the sniper to save Ant, but any misstep may ruin their faltering reconciliation, and end in death. When body parts begin to wash up on shore, it looks like the sniper is growing more desperate…

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Before Mrs. Beeton and well before Julia Child, there was Eliza Acton, who changed the course of cookery writing forever.

England 1837. Victorian London is awash with exciting new ingredients from spices to exotic fruits, but Eliza Acton has no desire to spend her days in the kitchen. Determined to be a poet and shamed by the suggestion she write a cookery book instead, she at first refuses to even consider the task. But then her father is forced to flee the country for bankruptcy, shaming the family while leaving them in genteel poverty. As a woman, Eliza has few options, so she methodically collects recipes while teaching herself the mysteries of the kitchen. And to her surprise, she discovers she is not only talented at cooking—she loves it.

To assist her, she hires seventeen-year-old Ann Kirby, the impoverished daughter of a war-injured father and a mother losing her grip on reality. Under Eliza’s tutelage, Ann learns about poetry, cookery, and love, while unravelling a mystery in her mistress’s past. Through the art of food, Eliza and Ann develop an unusual friendship and break the mold of traditional cookbooks by adding elegant descriptions and ingredient lists, that are still used today.

Told in alternate voices, this is an amazing novel of female friendship, the ensuring struggle for freedom, the quiet joy of cookery, and the place of food in creativity all while bringing Eliza Acton out of the archives and back into the public eye. 

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This isn’t a love story. This is Impossible.

Nick: Failed writer. Failed husband. Dog owner.

Bee: Serial dater. Dress maker. Pringles enthusiast.

One day, their paths cross over a misdirected email. The connection is instant, electric. They feel like they’ve known each other all their lives.

Nick buys a new suit, gets on a train. Bee steps away from her desk, sets off to meet him under the clock at Euston station.

Think you know how the rest of the story goes? They did too . . .

But this is a story with more twists than most. This is Impossible.

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How a nation still in grief from the Great War found the courage and resilience to face a new tragedy, the Great Depression.

Some generations are born unlucky. Australians who survived the horrors of the Great War and the Spanish flu epidemic that followed were soon faced with the shock of the Great Depression. Today we remember long dole queues, shanty towns and destitute men roaming the country in search of work. With over a third of the workforce unemployed in 1932, Australia was one of the hardest hit countries in the world. Yet this is not the complete story.

In this wide-ranging account of the Great Depression in Australia, Joan Beaumont shows how high levels of debt and the collapse of wool and wheat prices left Australia particularly exposed in the world’s worst depression. Threatened with national insolvency, and with little room for policy innovation, governments resorted to austerity and deflation. Violent protests erupted in the streets and paramilitary movements threatened the political order.

It might have ended very differently, but Australia’s democratic institutions survived the ordeal. Australia’s people, too, survived. While many endured great hardship, anger, anxiety and despair, most ‘made do’ and helped each other. Some even found something positive in the memory of this personal and communal struggle. Australia’s Great Depression details this most impressive narrative of resilience in the nation’s history

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Thanks for stopping by!

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? #IMWAYR @thebookdate #SundayPost @Kimbacaffeinate #SundaySalon @debnance I’m reading #TheLanguageofFood #ThoseWhoPerish #Impossible #Australia’sGreatDepression

20 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. harvee
    Mar 14, 2022 @ 10:10:44

    The Language of Food sounds delightful.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  2. Northwoman
    Mar 14, 2022 @ 10:11:34

    I feel your concerns and I have them too. I’m glad to stay home with all the crazy out there.

    Anne – Books of My Heart This is my Sunday Post

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  3. Kathryn
    Mar 14, 2022 @ 11:52:56

    Relieved to hear your area escaped the bad rain and flooding. It is just devastating for the areas that were hit. I rely on Mamma Mia podcast to keep me updated. Yes I am trying to avoid Omicron as well these days.Cases are rife here at present. Thank goodness for good books.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  4. Carla
    Mar 14, 2022 @ 12:41:54

    Oh dear, I’m glad you missed the flooding, but it is terrible that so many areas were hit. So awful for the library to lose all their books. I am still masking when I go out and staying out of crowds, as I don’t want to get sick.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  5. Greg
    Mar 14, 2022 @ 13:41:40

    I’m so sorry to hear about the flooding- that’s awful. Glad your area wasn’t hit as bad but that must be nervewracking to have your daughter’s area affected.

    It’s really sad that there’s so much we don’t know about Covid and yet so many in our society just don’t seem interested in long term impacts, or believe misinformation.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  6. Tracey (Carpe Librum)
    Mar 14, 2022 @ 20:20:58

    I’m reading The Language of Food at the moment and absolutely loving it!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  7. Stephanie - Bookfever
    Mar 14, 2022 @ 21:40:13

    Everything is just shitty in the world right now. It kinda makes my own little problems be put into perspective. =/

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  8. Cindy Davis
    Mar 14, 2022 @ 23:58:48

    I am so glad you were not as affected by the flooding, but my heart breaks for the areas that were. I hope the library is able to raise a lot of funds! Have a good week!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  9. WordsAndPeace
    Mar 15, 2022 @ 00:38:11

    I’m glad your city is ok.
    Some good books here.
    I read Resurrection Bay and I found the plot a bit unsatisfying, though the idea for the main characters was really good: https://wordsandpeace.com/2018/06/04/book-review-resurrection-bay/

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  10. Mae Sander
    Mar 15, 2022 @ 00:50:38

    The story of Australia in the Great Depression sounds quite interesting. In the US, we rarely hear anything about Australian history at all.

    I”m glad you escaped being flooded.

    best… mae at maefood.blogspot.com

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  11. Laurel-Rain Snow
    Mar 15, 2022 @ 01:27:36

    I like the look of Impossible. Enjoy your books and your week, and stay safe! Thanks for visiting my blog.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  12. Deb Nance at Readerbuzz
    Mar 15, 2022 @ 01:29:15

    As I know first-hand, flooding is a nightmare. My husband and I were flooded in our first apartment a year after we married, and everyone we know was also flooded. We had months of trying to get back to normal. I feel for all of you in Australia.

    I really like the sound of The Language of Food. That’s exactly the sort of story that I enjoy.

    I always think about the Great Depression in terms of my home country, but I do know that it occurred all over the world. I bet Australia’s Great Depression is interesting.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  13. Tina Culbertson
    Mar 15, 2022 @ 02:12:58

    Happy to hear the rain skirted your area but wow, what a mess in Sydney. I hope your daughter is safe.
    Thanks to you and Sandy (Sandy’s Book a Day blog) I have to get the Peter Swanson book., Sounds great.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  14. Louise H
    Mar 15, 2022 @ 05:12:02

    So glad you and yours are safe. Our government had taken to giving permission for housing to be built on known flood plains – mainly due to housing pressures. However, this means the owners either have to pay exorbitant insurance fees or can’t even get insurance against flooding. Since it’s a common issue now in the UK there are investments in flood defences as well as schemes where farmland is used to divert floodwater.

    The Language of Food sounds like a fascinating story and I’m totally hooked by the blurb of Impossible! Have a good week.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  15. Kathy Martin
    Mar 15, 2022 @ 05:55:13

    So many difficult things! I’m glad I live in boring Minnesota – no floods, Covid numbers going down, and Ukraine quite far away though some refugees are trickling into the State. Come see my week here. Happy reading!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  16. yvonne473
    Mar 15, 2022 @ 10:44:48

    I’m glad you escaped the floods, but so sorry you and everyone else had to go through that experience. I’m sure it was quite stressful. I hope this is a good week for you.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  17. stargazer
    Mar 15, 2022 @ 11:12:12

    Good to hear you escaped the flooding. Hope you are enjoying all your reads, it looks like a good selection. The Language of Food appeals, I’ve seen positive reviews and I like food-related stories.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  18. WendyW
    Mar 16, 2022 @ 09:48:21

    I”m so glad you avoided the flooding, and so sorry it’s hurt so many people.

    Like

    Reply

  19. Mystica
    Mar 17, 2022 @ 13:38:10

    Here too we are either in a flood or a drought situation. Both equally disastrous. Right now in a situation with severe lack of diesel, petrol and gas. Hopefully the gas shortage will be temporary. I am desperate to buy gas right now and have put my name down with the local agent who will call as soon as he gets supplies. It is a tense situation to be in.
    On the book front I like the Abbs book very much. I find cookery books make me less tense right now and trying out something simple is helpful.

    Like

    Reply

  20. Helen Murdoch
    Mar 21, 2022 @ 01:43:47

    Between Ukraine and other refugee situations, climate issues, COVID, etc there is just so much to stress about. That doesn’t even hit on the personal. I am spending time with my daughter, which definitely makes things better!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

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