It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? #SundayPost #SundaySalon

 

Linking to: It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? at BookDate; Sunday Post @ Caffeinated Reviewer; and the Sunday Salon @ ReaderBuzz

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Life…

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Uneventful, but somehow busy.

Have you ever got stuck when writing a review? It seems to be happening to me more often lately. I draft and edit in an endless loop sometimes trying to put together something coherent, and I’m never even sure I manage it. I seem to get stuck in my own head, and the more I try to force it the worse it gets. And because I don’t like to get too far ahead without having a review done, my reading suffers. I’m not sure if I’m asking for advice or simply indulging myself with a pity party.

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What I’ve Read Since I last Posted…

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Lives Like Mine by Eve Verde

The Children’s Secret by Nina Monroe

About Us by Sinead Moriarty

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New Posts…

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Review: The Newcomer by Laura Elizabeth Woollett

Review: The Wattle Seed Inn by Leonie Kelsall

Review: Lives Like Mine by Eva Verde

Review: About Us by Sinead Moriarty

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What I’m Reading This Week…

 


ONE MISSING BOY.

Marissa Irvine arrives at 14 Tudor Grove, expecting to pick up her young son Milo from his first playdate with a boy at his new school. But the woman who answers the door isn’t a mother she recognises. She isn’t the nanny. She doesn’t have Milo. And so begins every parent’s worst nightmare.

FOUR GUILTY WOMEN.

As news of the disappearance filters through the quiet Dublin suburb and an unexpected suspect is named, whispers start to spread about the women most closely connected to the shocking event. Because only one of them may have taken Milo – but they could all be blamed . . .

IN A COMMUNITY FULL OF SECRETS, WHO IS REALLY AT FAULT?

xxxxxxx

 

My life as a tactical cop. The impact. The aftermath.

From the bestselling author of Drugs, Guns & Lies, comes Keith’s story of what it was really like to be a tactical police officer in the violent and corrupt eighties

‘Fear and exhilaration are blood brothers; that’s what drives risk. I should have been careful what I wished for.’

Keith Banks was a member of the Queensland Police Force when not everyone with a badge could be trusted.

After serving as an undercover cop and declining an opportunity to participate in a lucrative and totally corrupt enterprise, Keith found himself sidelined from the Drug Squad. In 1984 he was transferred to the Taringa Criminal Investigation Branch as a Detective Senior Constable. That had its moments, but he wanted more. He missed the adrenaline charge of his days as an undercover cop. He discovered that rush again when, ultimately, he became one of the first full-time members of the Tactical Response Group.

This was challenging and dangerous work. Not only did Keith find himself facing off against some of Australia’s most brutal criminals, but he also had to confront the demons of constantly living on the edge, of finding that fine line between good and bad where violence was normal.

Raw and confronting, Gun to the Head exposes a world of policing that few have lived.

xxxxxxx

 

A DEADLY PROSECUTOR

They call him the King of Death Row. Randal Korn has sent more men to their deaths than any district attorney in the history of the United States.

A TWISTED RITUALISTIC KILLING

When a young woman, Skylar Edwards, is found murdered in Buckstown, Alabama, a corrupt sheriff arrests the last person to see her alive, Andy Dubois. It doesn’t seem to matter to anyone that Andy is innocent.

A SMALL TOWN BOILING WITH RAGE

Everyone in Buckstown believes Andy is guilty. He has no hope of a fair trial. And the local defense attorney assigned to represent him has disappeared.

A FORMER CON-ARTIST

Hot shot New York lawyer Eddie Flynn travels south to fight fire with fire. He plans to destroy the prosecutors case, find the real killer and save Andy from the electric chair.

But the murders are just beginning.

Is Eddie Flynn next?

xxxxxx

 

Newlyweds Lina and Cain don’t make it out to their vacation home on gorgeous Lake Tarawera as often as they’d like, so when Cain suggests they rent the property out on weekends, Lina reluctantly agrees. While the home has been special to her family for generations, their neighbors are all signing up to host renters, and frankly, she and Cain could use the extra money. What could go wrong? And at first, Lina is amazed at how quickly guests line up to spend a weekend–and at how much they’re willing to pay. 

But both Lina and Cain have been keeping secrets, secrets that won’t be kept out by a new alarm system or a locked cupboard. When strange things begin happening on their property, and a visit takes a deadly turn, Lina becomes convinced that someone out there knows something they shouldn’t–and that when they come for her, there will be nowhere left to hide.

xxxxxx

 

February, 1967. Walls of flame reduce much of Tasmania to ash.

Young schoolteacher Catherine Turner rushes to the Huon Valley to find her family’s apple orchard destroyed, her childhood home in ruins and her brother dead. Despite her father’s declaration that a woman will never run the orchard, Catherine resolves to rebuild the family business.

After five sons, Catherine’s friend and neighbour, Annie Pearson, is overjoyed by the birth of a much longed for daughter. As Annie and her husband Dave work to repair the damage to their orchard, Dave’s friend Mark pitches in, despite the fact that Annie wants him gone. Mark has moved his family to the valley to escape his life in Melbourne, but his wife has disappeared leaving chaos in her wake and their young son Charlie in Mark’s care.

Catherine becomes fond of Charlie, whose strange upbringing has left him shy and withdrawn. However, the growing friendship between Mark and Catherine not only scandalises the small community but threatens a secret Annie is desperate to keep hidden.

Through natural disasters, personal calamities and the devastating collapse of the apple industry, Catherine, Annie and those they love battle to save their livelihoods, their families and their secrets.

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Thanks for stopping by!

30 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Mia is mine
    Jul 26, 2021 @ 09:27:58

    Such interesting looking reads! The cover of The Last Apple Season is so beautiful that it took my breath away! The plot sounds interesting as well!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  2. Theresa Smith Writes
    Jul 26, 2021 @ 09:39:03

    I get stuck and like you, I don’t like to keep reading and end up having to write multiple reviews as that just makes me more stuck. Sometimes when I feel this way, I head to Goodreads and scan other reviews for the book. It seems to help clarify my own thoughts as I start to think about what I agree with or disagree with in those other reviews.

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply

  3. Kathryn
    Jul 26, 2021 @ 09:58:43

    Pity party heard! My advice which you are welcome to leave at the side of the road is just go easy on yourself and write less for each book. For awhile anyway, until you feel wordy again. It will happen!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  4. Helen Murdoch
    Jul 26, 2021 @ 15:13:06

    I think we all get stuck on review writing sometimes. Even if I really love a book, something I feel like there isn’t much to say except that I really loved it. And, that’s got to be enough. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  5. sandysbookaday
    Jul 26, 2021 @ 17:10:27

    So jealous that you have the Steve Cavanagh, Shelleyrae! And in answer to your question, yes! The more reviews I write, the harder it is to come up with something fresh. I suffer the problem of writing really good reviews in my head, then once I bring up my keyboard, it just disappears, never to be retrieved 🤷‍♀️🤦‍♀️ ❤📚

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  6. czai
    Jul 26, 2021 @ 17:54:12

    I feel you on getting stuck in writing reviews. It’s extremely frustrating and I’m trying to find ways to get myself back in the mood for it. Looks like you’re on to some interesting reads this week. Hope you have a great week ahead!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  7. Deb Nance at Readerbuzz
    Jul 26, 2021 @ 21:39:09

    One common experience of the bookish/blogging world seems to be getting stuck in writing reviews. I try not to overthink my reviews, and I remind myself that I am just a simple reader, not a professional reviewer (which is easy to see when I reread what I write). You are a beautiful writer, and your reviews are always honest and heartfelt and well thought out. Getting stuck occasionally is going to happen.

    In a similar way, we readers often suffer from inability to read. I think that’s another common experience.

    Perhaps we need occasional visits to doctors familiar with these afflictions!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  8. Beth F
    Jul 26, 2021 @ 22:07:35

    Oh yeah, I too can get stuck with reviews. Sigh.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  9. Erin @ Cracker Crumb Life
    Jul 26, 2021 @ 22:50:34

    The Last Apple Season looks good!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  10. Kathy Martin
    Jul 27, 2021 @ 00:21:10

    My reviews tend to be quick thoughts and plot highlights. Even so, I sometimes get stuck trying to figure out what to say about a book too. Come see my week here.Happy reading!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  11. Laurel-Rain Snow
    Jul 27, 2021 @ 00:27:55

    All Her Fault sounds really good! Enjoy your week, and thanks for sharing. And thanks for visiting my blog.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  12. Stephanie - Bookfever
    Jul 27, 2021 @ 00:42:51

    To be honest, I get stuck a lot these days writing reviews. You know the winter blues? I think I have the summer blues…

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  13. gulfsidemusing
    Jul 27, 2021 @ 01:14:47

    That happens to me far too frequently with writing reviews. I’m down to just a few sentences these days… and it seems like the more I like a book, the harder it is to review! Ugh.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  14. yvonne473
    Jul 27, 2021 @ 03:24:49

    This happens to me alot lately. First, trying to use different words to describe books, characters and settings is difficult. Then, just trying to summarize the book can be difficult. Since I read mostly thrillers and mysteries, I’m try so hard not to give spoilers, too. Like you, I don’t like to get too far ahead in my reading until I’ve completed a review. It can be difficult sometimes and other times, it all just comes to me right away.

    I hope you have a great week. Your books look really good.

    Like

    Reply

  15. Anne - Books of My Heart
    Jul 27, 2021 @ 04:44:52

    Definitely! Sometimes I feel like I say the same things in every review. I try not to spoil or repeat the blurb so I end up talking about the characters, the plot and the writing.

    Like

    Reply

  16. sjhigbee
    Jul 27, 2021 @ 06:03:04

    Urg! It sounds as if you’re going through writer’s block… So sorry to hear it, because it’s a miserable thing to work through. Anne’s advice above is actually one of the ways out of it – construct a writing frame, so you start off by explaining why you picked out the book as the intro, then go through the characters, the plot and the writing – or the pace, or the mood… whatever you prefer discussing. But don’t try to talk about more than 3 of them. It might be seem very basic and by-the-numbers – but your writing doesn’t have to reflect it:)). I hope you have a better week, Shelleyrae.

    Like

    Reply

  17. Hannah
    Jul 27, 2021 @ 07:26:56

    I’ve just allowed myself to not review when that happens. Or come back to it later.

    Like

    Reply

  18. Aj @ Read All The Things!
    Jul 27, 2021 @ 09:07:33

    I’m so bad with reviews! After I finish a book, I scribble down a few sentences. I always mean to expand them, but that never seems to happen. I just end up with tiny, sad reviews.

    Like

    Reply

  19. WendyW
    Jul 27, 2021 @ 09:29:48

    Great list of books! I am feeling the same way as you about reviews, it’s tough sometimes, but I’m sure you’ll get your groove back soon.

    Like

    Reply

  20. Greg
    Jul 27, 2021 @ 18:02:14

    I definitely have that problem with reviews sometimes. there are some that just flow and others that… don’t. lol

    I like the look of your thrillers.

    Like

    Reply

  21. BookerTalk
    Jul 28, 2021 @ 06:45:07

    I would never have guessed you struggle to write reviews, yours always seem so thoughtful. It takes me forever to write a review – its a very very painful and slow process to watch. Like others have said here, I struggle to find alternative ways to describe a book.

    Like

    Reply

  22. sydneyeditor1
    Jul 29, 2021 @ 22:22:24

    The Devil’s Advocate sounds brilliant — and you’ve reminded me i’ve read this author before, and thhis is a great one to jump back into the series !

    Like

    Reply

  23. Cheryl Malandrinos
    Aug 02, 2021 @ 12:12:43

    I tend to get stuck writing reviews if I have read a lot of books lately. All the reviews end up sounding the same to me.

    Looks like you have some great books to read. Hope you enjoy them.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

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