It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? #SundayPost #SundaySalon

 

Linking to: It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? at BookDate; Sunday Post @ Caffeinated Reviewer; and the Sunday Salon @ ReaderBuzz

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Life…

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What I’ve Read Since I last Posted…

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Written in Bone by Sue Black

Nancy Business by R.W.R. McDonald

Love, In Theory by Elodie Cheesman

Magpie’s Bend by Maya Linnell

Mirror Man by Fiona McIntosh

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New Posts…

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Review: Written in Bone by Sue Black

Blog Tour Review: Nancy Business by R.W.R. McDonald

WIN A COPY OF Nancy Business by R.W.R. McDonald

Review: Love, In Theory by Elodie Cheesman

Review: Magpie’s Bend by Maya Linnell

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What I’m Reading This Week…

 


November, 1921. Edward VIII, Prince of Wales and future ruler of India, is arriving in Bombay to begin a four-month tour. The Indian subcontinent is chafing under British rule, and Bombay solicitor Perveen Mistry isn’t surprised when local unrest over the royal arrival spirals into riots. But she’s horrified by the death of Freny Cuttingmaster, an eighteen-year-old female Parsi student, who falls from a second-floor gallery just as the prince’s grand procession is passing by her college.

Freny had come for a legal consultation just days before her death, and what she confided makes Perveen suspicious that her death was not an accident. Feeling guilty for failing to have helped Freny in life, Perveen steps forward to assist Freny’s family in the fraught dealings of the coroner’s inquest. When Freny’s death is ruled a murder, Perveen knows she can’t rest until she sees justice done. But Bombay is erupting: as armed British secret service march the streets, rioters attack anyone with perceived British connections and desperate shopkeepers destroy their own wares so they will not be targets of racial violence. Can Perveen help a suffering family when her own is in danger?

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You just boarded a flight to New York.

There are one hundred and forty-three other passengers onboard.

What you don’t know is that thirty minutes before the flight your pilot’s family was kidnapped.

For his family to live, everyone on your plane must die.

The only way the family will survive is if the pilot follows his orders and crashes the plane.

Enjoy the flight

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What could drive a mother to do the unthinkable?

Before: Emma Cormac married into a perfect life but now she’s barely coping. Inside a brand new, palatial home, her three young children need more than she can give. Clem, a wilful four year old, is intent on mimicking her grandmother; the formidable matriarch Pat Cormac. Arthur is almost three and still won’t speak. At least baby Robbie is perfect. He’s the future of the family. So why can’t Emma hold him without wanting to scream?

Beyond their gleaming windows, a lake vista is evaporating. The birds have mostly disappeared, too. All over Shorehaven, the Cormac family buys up land to develop into cheap housing for people they openly scorn.

After: The summers have grown even fiercer and the Cormac name doesn’t mean what it used to. Arthur has taken it abroad, far from a family unable to understand him. Clem is a young artist who turns obsessively to the same dark subject. Pat doesn’t even know what legacy means now. Not since the ground started sinking beneath her.

Meanwhile, a nameless woman has been released from state care. She sticks to her twelve-step program, recites her affirmations, works one day at a time on a humble life devoid of ambition or redemption. How can she have an after when baby Robbie doesn’t?

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Bri Lee, best-selling and award-winning author of Eggshell Skull, asks Who gets to be smart? in this forensic and hard-hitting exploration of knowledge, power and privilege.

In 2018 Bri Lee’s brilliant young friend Damian was named a Rhodes Scholar, an apex of academic achievement. When she goes to visit him and takes a tour of Oxford and Rhodes House, she begins questioning her belief in a system she has previously revered, as she learns the truth behind what Virginia Woolf described almost a century earlier as the ‘stream of gold and silver’ that flows through elite institutions and dictates decisions about who deserves to be educated there. The question that forms in her mind drives the following two years of conversations and investigations: who gets to be smart?

Interrogating the adage, ‘knowledge is power’, and calling institutional prejudice to account, Bri once again dives into her own privilege and presumptions to bring us the stark and confronting results. Far from offering any ‘equality of opportunity’, Australia’s education system exacerbates social stratification. The questions Bri asks of politics and society have their answers laid bare in the response to the Ramsay Centre for Western Civilisation, COVID-19, and the Black Lives Matter protests of 2020.

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Thanks for stopping by!

9 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Northwoman
    Jun 15, 2021 @ 03:33:37

    You always have such a diverse set of reads. A few don’t seem to be available in the US but you probably have that happen with US books as well. Book Depository might have them though.

    Anne – Books of My Heart This is my Sunday Post

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  2. Deb Nance at Readerbuzz
    Jun 15, 2021 @ 04:42:44

    I am fascinated with Who Gets to Be Smart? I will be interested to hear your thoughts about it and I hope I get a chance to read it. The Bombay Prince looks good, too.

    I love your rough week meme. I saved it so I can share it with others. It seems like every week has been a rough week since March of 2020.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  3. Helen Murdoch
    Jun 15, 2021 @ 06:08:04

    The book Falling sounds really intense, but as if it could be super good. Can’t wait to see what you think of it.

    I am sorry you had a rough week, I hope this coming week is better!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  4. thebookdisciple
    Jun 15, 2021 @ 09:17:24

    Who gets to be smart sounds really interesting! Hopefully, next week is better for you!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  5. Jennifer
    Jun 15, 2021 @ 12:18:03

    Here’s hoping that this week is a terrific one!

    Like

    Reply

  6. Kathryn
    Jun 15, 2021 @ 12:28:12

    Smiling at your rough week but still even though no bail or body count sometimes other things are tough. All the best Shellyrae and hope this week smiles on you.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  7. Jinjer
    Jun 15, 2021 @ 12:51:31

    Ack! None of my libraries have a physical copy or an ebook copy of Falling. Sounds so good!

    Like

    Reply

  8. Greg
    Jun 15, 2021 @ 16:28:03

    I think The Bombay Prince looks pretty good!

    Like

    Reply

  9. Literary Feline
    Jun 17, 2021 @ 04:16:42

    I read Written in Bone recently too and liked it. The Bombay Prince sounds good. I hope you are enjoying it as well as your other reads! Have a great week!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

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