Blog Tour Review: The Moroccan Daughter by Deborah Rodriguez

Title: The Moroccan Daughter

Author: Deborah Rodriguez

Published: 2nd February 2021, Bantam Australia

Status: Read February 2021 courtesy PenguinRandomHouse

++++++

My Thoughts:

The Moroccan Daughter is the engaging second contemporary novel from Deborah Rodriguez to feature hairstylist Charlie and her eccentric grandmother, Bea, who first appear in Island On the Edge of the World.

When Amina is summoned home to Morocco for her sister’s wedding, she urges her best friend Charlie, and Charlie’s grandmother, Bea, to join her, in the hopes that they will provide her with moral support when she finally tells her traditionalist, religious father that she is married to an American man. Though happy to be of assistance to her friend, Charlie also sees the trip as an opportunity to resolve a youthful mistake, while Bea is simply delighted with the opportunity to experience Morocco’s unique culture.

A story of friendship, family, tradition and secrets, The Moroccan Daughter is full of drama as it unfolds from the perspectives of Amina, Charlie, Bea and Samira.

Samira is the Bennis family housekeeper, who keeps many of its secrets, including one that has the power to change Amina’s life. While Amina struggles with a way to tell her father the truth about her life in California, a task made more urgent when her husband, Max, turns up on their doorstep, Samira wonders if it would help her to know the truth.

Charlie’s secret is completely unexpected, involving a mystery man who she met three years earlier during her earlier backpacking travels, and adds a touch of suspense to the novel when it becomes clear he is not quite whom he seems.

Bea is delightful – optimistic, curious and unconventional, she does not let her near-total blindness hold her back. Her interest in people is disarming, and her concern for their well-being sincere, even if she is occasionally a touch meddlesome. Bea also has a keen interest in the mystical, and in possession of her own special abilities, she is intrigued by a nearby Apothecary and eager to learn more about Moroccan shawafas (witches).

Rodriguez transports the reader to Morocco with her rich, sensory descriptions of the bustling Medina in Fes, the tranquil Riad which is home to the Bennis family, and the rocky, dusty landscape of the Atlas Mountains. I liked that I felt I learnt something about the culture of Morocco, from its extravagant weddings to the plight of the Amazigh (or Imazighen).

The Moroccan Daughter is a pleasant escape to an exotic location with engaging characters, and wonderfully Rodriguez provides a handful of delicious authentic Moroccan recipes that can only enhance the reading experience.

+++++

Available from PenguinRandomHouse

Or from your preferred retailer via Booko I Book Depository I Booktopia I Amazon

8 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Amanda Barrett
    Feb 14, 2021 @ 08:57:30

    I enjoyed your review! Great stop in the blog tour, thanks Shelleyrae.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  2. Liz Dexter
    Feb 14, 2021 @ 18:55:53

    That does look a good read – as does the first one!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  3. Marg
    Feb 14, 2021 @ 22:31:08

    This does sound really good!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  4. Trackback: It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? #SundayPost #SundaySalon | book'd out
  5. Laurel-Rain Snow
    Feb 15, 2021 @ 01:50:46

    Sounds delightful! Thanks for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  6. Helen Murdoch
    Feb 15, 2021 @ 05:24:34

    I was really hoping you’d like this book more, bummer! I love books set in the Middle East/North Africa region.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  7. Jackie
    Feb 15, 2021 @ 06:52:35

    This is cool, I know her son from Mazatlan Mexico!

    Like

    Reply

  8. Verushka, an editor (@SydneyEditor1)
    Feb 18, 2021 @ 21:01:05

    These women are sooo lovely — I want to know their stories! And, I am adoring the setting too.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

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