Review: The Viennese Girl by Jenny Lecoat

 

Title: The Viennese Girl

Author: Jenny Lecoat

Published: April 28th 2020, Allen & Unwin

Status: Read April 2020, courtesy Allen & Unwin

++++++

My Thoughts:

The Viennese Girl by Jenny Lecoat is inspired by the true story of Hedwig Bercu-Goldberg, a young Jewish woman who escaped the Nazi forces in Vienna, only to find herself trapped on Jersey, a small island in the English Channel, during the German occupation in 1940.

Hedy understands all too well the threat the Nazi’s presence poses to Jersey’s residents, and as a Jew, is desperate to escape their notice. Terrified and angry as conditions on the island worsen, she is forced to volunteer as a translator for the enemy, but uses the opportunity to wage a secret rebellion.

I wasn’t sure about Hedy to begin with, I didn’t like the way she took out her fears on her best friend or his sweet girlfriend, Dorothea, even though I was sympathetic to her anxiety. However I did like that Lecoat avoided characterising her as a saint, and as the story progressed I admired Hedy’s courage, her strength of character, and her resilience.

And while we are currently in the middle of a pandemic and are asked to remain at home, I can’t imagine how Hedy bore eighteen months hiding in Dory’s house sleeping in the attic, or under the floorboards knowing that should she be found it would mean death for herself and everyone she cares about.

The romance between Hedy and German Lieutenant Kurt Neumann is captivating, given as star-crossed lovers they literally risk certain death should they be discovered. Knowing that the story reflects the true circumstances of the couple definitely intensifies the emotion, and I think Lecoat’s portrayal of their relationship was well developed.

I actually would have liked for Lecoat to have taken more care to develop the character of Dorothea though. I didn’t feel as if I understood Dory, nor the relationship she and Hedy had, and I think that was a missed opportunity to add another layer of depth to the story.

Lecoat’s descriptions of the island during Nazi occupation do paint a vivid portrait, especially as she writes about the infrastructure the German’s built, and the deprivations the residents suffered as the soldiers appropriated their goods, livestock and food, leaving the populace to starve.

Despite the grim circumstances in which the novel is set, The Viennese Girl is a tale of hope, love and redemption. A well written and engaging piece of historical fiction.

++++++

Available from Allen & Unwin     RRP AUD$29.99

Or from your preferred retailer via Booko I Book Depository

3 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Mic
    Apr 29, 2020 @ 10:46:23

    I have recently read this as well, and am struggling to review this week. Great review, I concur completely

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  2. Marg
    Apr 29, 2020 @ 19:16:47

    I love the sound of this book!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  3. Trackback: It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? #SundayPost #SundaySalon | book'd out

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