Happy Father’s Day, Dad!

It’s Father’s Day today, so I thought I’d share the top five books on my dad’s wishlist.

 

Larrikins In Khaki by Tim Bowden

From recruitment and training and the battlegrounds of Palestine, North Africa, Thailand, Burma and beyond, here are the highly individual stories of Australia’s World War II Diggers told in their own voices – warts and all.
With a reputation for being hard to discipline, generosity to their comrades, frankness and sticking it up any sign of pomposity, Australian soldiers were a wild and irreverent lot, even in the worst of circumstances during World War II.
In Larrikins in Khaki, Tim Bowden has collected compelling and vivid stories of individual soldiers whose memoirs were mostly self-published and who told of their experiences with scant regard for literary pretensions and military niceties. Most of these men had little tolerance for military order and discipline, and NCOs and officers who were hopeless at their jobs were made aware of it. They laughed their way through the worst of it by taking the mickey out of one another and their superiors.
From recruitment and training to the battlegrounds of Palestine, North Africa, Thailand, New Guinea, Borneo and beyond, here are the highly individual stories of Australia’s World War II Diggers told in their own voices – warts and all.

 

Taking Tom Murray Home by Tim Slee

Bankrupt dairy farmer Tom Murray decides he’d rather sell off his herd and burn down his own house than hand them over to the bank. But something goes tragically wrong, and Tom dies in the blaze. His wife, Dawn, doesn’t want him to have died for nothing and decides to hold a funeral procession for Tom as a protest, driving 350km from Yardley in country Victoria to bury him in Melbourne where he was born. To make a bigger impact she agrees with some neighbours to put his coffin on a horse and cart and take it slow – real slow.
But on the night of their departure, someone burns down the local bank. And as the motley funeral procession passes through Victoria, there are more mysterious arson attacks. Dawn has five days to get to Melbourne. Five days, five more towns, and a state ready to explode in flames…
Told with a laconic, deadpan wit, Taking Tom Murray Home is a timely, thought-provoking, heart-warming, quintessentially Australian story like no other. It’s a novel about grief, pain, anger and loss, yes, but it’s also about hope – and how community, friends and love trump pain and anger, every time.

 

City of Windows by Robert Pobi

During the worst blizzard in memory, an FBI agent in a moving SUV in New York City is killed by a nearly impossible sniper shot. Unable to pinpoint where the shot came from, as the storm rapidly wipes out evidence, the agent-in-charge Brett Kehoe turns to the one man who might be able to help them–former FBI agent Lucas Page.
Page, a university professor and bestselling author, left the FBI years ago after a tragic event robbed him of a leg, an arm, an eye, and the willingness to continue. But he has an amazing ability to read a crime scene, figure out angles and trajectories in his head, and he might be the only one to be able to find the sniper’s nest. With a new wife and family, Lucas Page has no interest in helping the FBI–except for the fact that the victim was his former partner.
Agreeing to help for his partner’s sake, Page finds himself hunting a killer with an unknown agenda and amazing sniper skills in the worst of conditions. And his partner’s murder is only the first in a series of meticulously planned murders carried out with all-but-impossible sniper shots. The only thing connecting the deaths is that the victims are all with law enforcement–that is until Page’s own family becomes a target.
To identify and hunt down this ruthless, seemingly unstoppable killer, Page must discover what hidden past connects the victims before he himself loses all that is dear to him.

 

See You at the Toxeth by Peter Corris edited by Jean Bedford

A selection of stories featuring Australia’s favourite PI, plus unpublished writing by Peter Corris on crime.
For almost four decades Peter Corris was known as ‘the godfather of Australian crime fiction’, and Cliff Hardy has been Australia’s favourite private investigator since he solved his first case in 1980. This selection of stories starts with Cliff’s early days driving round Glebe in his battered Falcon, drinking at the Toxteth Hotel and taking on cases that more often than not leave him as battered as his car. As Cliff becomes older and wiser, he prefers to use his head more than his fists, but the cases are as tricky as ever and Hardy’s clients lead him to the murkiest surroundings.
To further celebrate Peter Corris’s legacy, editor Jean Bedford has also included a selection of his columns on the world of crime and crime writing, along with his ‘ABC of Crime Writing’. From Adultery to Yeti, via Gumshoe, Hit man and The Mob, this entertaining compendium gives a fascinating insight into Peter’s vast knowledge of the genre.

 

The Last Bushrangers by Mike Munroe

The story of Australia’s last bushranging gang – the murderous Kenniffs. Easter Sunday, 1902, deep in the Carnarvon Ranges a police constable and station manager are slain then later incinerated, their remains stuffed into saddlebags. Accused of the ghoulish crime are two members of the bushranging Kenniff gang, fast gaining notoriety as Queensland’s equivalent of the Kelly gang. Yet the murders are a bold escalation from the petty fraud, horse stealing and cattle duffing the gang is known for.
Starving and exhausted after three long months on the run, the brothers are finally captured, and so the wheels of justice start to turn.
The story of the Kenniffs has fascinated Mike Munro for decades – ever since he found out these last bushrangers were his family. If not for Mike’s grandfather illegally changing his name in shame from Kenniff to Munro, this major figure in Australian television would be known to us as Mike Kenniff.
But who were Mike’s relatives? What drove them to their life of crime? And were the brothers really responsible for such terrible murders?
In answering these questions Mike Munro takes us back to the dawn of Federation, when bush skills and horsemanship could help outlaws escape the police, when remote pastoralists were vulnerable targets for thieves and marauders, when race and class divides were entrenched – but resented – and when brutal, feckless outlaws faced the ultimate punishment.
This is a story that is both gripping and personal, and an insight into an Australia just coming of age.

 

Love you Dad!

 

 

 

 

 

 

4 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Cherry
    Sep 01, 2019 @ 11:24:35

    These all sound great and would like to read them myself! Mum xx

    >

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  2. Trin Carl
    Sep 01, 2019 @ 22:21:54

    Australian soldiers…Now that’s a group of people I don’t know know a lot about . I’ve read a lot on WW2 and I’m intrigued.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  3. Vicki
    Sep 02, 2019 @ 00:37:44

    Happy Father’s Day to your dad! Our Father’s Day is June 16th.
    My dad loved to read too!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

  4. Trackback: It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? #SundayPost #SundaySalon | book'd out

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